Thursday, July 24, 2008

The Johnny Estrada Story


"Mentally, I'm ready to go home." Great, take the parting gifts with you. This comment, the actual statement by Johnny Estrada upon being Designated For Assignment by Our Washington Nationals. Followed up by this gem: "I still know I have a lot left in the tank, and look forward to playing against the Nationals."

Nice, thanks for coming, look forward to seeing you soon.

Johnny Estrada was Designated for Assignment this afternoon by Our Washington Nationals. A necessary move to recall Lastings Milledge from rehab and the disabled list. Then he took every opportunity given by the media to blast everyone in sight--including the very fact that "[Heck] no. You won't see me in Triple AAA. You can print that, too."

What a nice guy, Johnny Estrada, A man who can't appreciate that Our Washington Nationals gave him an opportunity, when NO ONE ELSE WOULD, and that's how he shows his appreciation. What a wonderful man.

And to think, this is the ONLY PLAYER IS THE HISTORY OF SPRING TRAINING for Our Washington Nationals, that has REFUSED to speak to The African Queen. That was his decision and she respected it. But that Story Is True--and Funny. It also was a memorable moment.

Case closed. As Sohna said upon hearing of his release--"GOOD RIDDANCE."

And that is The Johnny Estrada Story For The Ages.

22 comments:

Anonymous said...

Not really news is it that Johnny Estrada is a jerk? $1.25 Million to be insulted.....wonder what Lerner thinks of Jimbo now?

Anonymous said...

This is proof that the braintrust is reading this blog!!!! (LMAO)

This may rank as JimBo's best move of the year and just glad he never showcased him in LF or 1B.

When will PLoD get his trade to the Yankees?

kenny said...

all i can say is thank goodness!!!

kennygmusings.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

I am glad Estrada snubbed YOU and your wife he was nice to me at spring training!

Anonymous said...

Your quote is FALSE go to Nationals.com and read what he said, once again SBF you are a liar!

"Mentally, I'm ready to go home. It has been a grind for me all year. I've been hurt. This is the first time, I've been hurt," Estrada said.

davidson said...

anonymous @ 11:32 PM and 12:03 AM,

If you're going to call out SBF, quit being "anonymous" and grow a pair...

phil dunn said...

Estrada is just another dumb signing by Bowden. He was not only injured but fat and totally out of shape. Too bad there isn't any accountability or Bowden would have been out the door long ago.

Anonymous said...

SBF, I agree with you on Estrada; however, just one question for you all -- do you think the players care about where they play, how they are perceived, etc., as much as we do about them?

Screech's Best Friend said...

Anonymous at 10:59AM-- Another variation of your question might be answered this way. And I had this exact conversation about this topic during the last home stand at Nationals Park. You and I most assurdly work for a living. In my business of television there are many talented people that care and make the effort each and every day. They are proud of what they accomplish. Each wants to put the best foot forward. Then, you have those others that somehow managed to just get a job in television. They just exist. They don't care about the job or the product. It's just a place to make ends meet, get paid, and it's frustrating to deal with them.

Most assurredly, baseball teams have many of these same issues. For some, playing the game they grew up loving--and sharing that passion--holds true each and every day. For others on the team, it's just a job. A paycheck. And you just have to deal with them too.

I believe many players care about where they play, just like I care about where I work. But, no doubt, there are others that do not have the same passion. Sad, but just a part of everyday life. Something not singled out by being fortunate enough to be a Major League Baseball Player.

That's my two cents.

Good question. Thanks.

SenatorNat said...

Chuck Stobbs obit in Post brought back a lot of fond memories for me - his resurgance in 1960 - when Senators were actually pretty good just prior to departing to Minn. St. Paul I certainly recall. And, of course, we know the legend of Mantle's 1953 565 foot "recorded home-run over the National Beer Garden in left at Griffith Stadium as diagrammed in the Post obit today. What is cool about the picture is noting the angle in centerfield and the oak tree that caused the angle to exist emanulated in Nationals Park. Very cool.

Also - I love the National Bo One-eyed Mustachioed Logo over the old Griffith Stadium Beer Garden pictured. Let's put it up in 3-D on the platform where the Iconic Baseball was supposed to go. How cool would that be - like a classic beer logo version of Bob's Big Boy!!

Johnny "We Hardly Knew Ye" Estrada - pity that a guy clearly in Jason Taylor shape with a true hunger to play and excel for the Nationals, and with such a passion for the game gets the heave-ho this way. Between LoDuca and Estrada, we could count on 30-40 Homeruns and 35% throw-out rate from behind the plate. Plus, they could sure teach those kids (Flores; Nieves) a thing or two about adjusting to major league pitching and hitting in the clutch. Together, they make about what the Chief made this year - and I would offer that the relative contribution is equal.

Trust in an LA check that will not bounce. And twinkies as a health meal. All Cut.

Stephen said...

This is picking up from the comments on Chad Cordero's non-tendering. I'm so sad the team has sunk this far. At the end of 2005, more than 30,000 people came to cheer a team, that though it finished .500, thrilled its fans for most of the season and gave Washington its first sniff of a pennant race since 1967.

When those Frank Robinson-led Nationals left the field, the crowd rose as one to cheer them and hail them. Washington was on fire for baseball and had fallen in love with the Nationals.

Now? The team is the worst in baseball. The ownership looks small and greedy (though I believe this is largely unfair), the team looks incompetent from top to bottom, and the General Manager is a crass, classless fool. He acts like he wants to be the face of the franchise. Ever notice how happy the ex-Nats are when they leave Washington. Brendan Harris, a far-better second baseman than Felipe Lopez who the Nationals had said, upon being traded, "It was like a breath of fresh air to get out of Washington." Everyone else who has left has said essentially the same thing. All but the wonderful Jamie Carroll, who has far too much grace and class to say such things in public.

I had so much hope at the end of the 2005 season. So much has gone so wrong since then - from the handling of Frank Robinson's departure to the Lerner's building that blocks what would have been a breathtaking view of the Capitol from most of the seats in good, but could have been spectacular Nationals Park. Having waited so long for baseball to return, this is a bitter disappointment, but still better than nothing...barely.

The comments about the incompetence of Sports Talk 980 and the rest resonates with me, too.

I've decided to do something about it. If you would like to hold a reasoned, respectful, virtual discussion about the Nationals and baseball in Washington, send me a question at sjw71490@yahoo.com. Eventually, I hope to conduct a call-in show over the Internet, but that's likely a year away.

In closing, I hope the decision-makers of the Nationals realize that Jim Bowden must be fired. If not, I expect average crowds below 20,000 next year and as far as the eye can see. JimBo has cast a pall over what could have been so many wonderful summers. Here's hoping he's gone soon.

Edward J. Cunningham said...

Johnny Estrada, if you are reading this, take a few words of advice. You don't have time to talk to every fan or sign every ball handed to you, but you need to remember that ultimately these fans pay your salary. When you prove yourself to be a major superstar, you can get away with being a jerk like Barry Bonds.

You sir, are no Barry Bonds.

Edward J. Cunningham said...

Stephen, short of retaining Frank Robinson as manager, or giving him a meaningful job as general manager or club president, how else could that fiasco have been averted? The Nats (from what SBF told me) wanted to honor Frank at a game next year, but they weren't going to keep him as manager or give him Stan or Jim Bowden's job. From what I saw in 2006, I honestly believe Manny Acta is a better manager and did a better job with what he had to work with. How would you have done things differently?

Edward J. Cunningham said...

I am glad Estrada snubbed YOU and your wife he was nice to me at spring training!

Time to put the shoe on the other foot, Annie. I don't believe a Nats hater like you who constantly bashes SBF in this blog has ever BEEN to spring training, let alone talked to Estrada. Post pictures you took from Viera along with your real name, and then I'll apologize!

Edward J. Cunningham said...

The comments about the incompetence of Sports Talk 980 and the rest resonates with me, too.

I can't remember where SBF talked about Sportstalk 980 (which has now been swallowed up by 3XESPN radio), but I have to give my two cents worth. On one of 980's shows, I heard the Sports Reporters talking about athletes in this area, and one of them actually said that Sonny Jurgensen was the most popular sports athlete in Washington ever.

Ever?

I hate to break it to these guys, but I do not think that even at the height of his playing career in the late 60's or early 70's that Sonny was ever as popular as Cal Ripken, Jr. is among Washington area fans NOW. Even the most visceral Oriole hater in the Natsverse will defer to Cal. Too many of these guys think ONLY in terms of football, and can't imagine what happened before their lifetime.

And as popular as Cal Ripken is now, he still played 40 miles away from Washington. Walter Perry Johnson was bigger nationwide than Ripken, and he was even bigger locally since Washington didn't HAVE to travel up to Baltimore to see him.

paul said...

Estrada never got into shape and was an embarrassment. He looked and played like Bob from accounting. The fact that he got any playing time at all was outrageous.

Perhaps he has a future, though, in a Franco Harris look alike contest. . . .

Stephen said...

To Edward J. -

On Frank Robinson -- I was ok with his release. The problem was the classless way it was handled. They let a great man twist in the wind for weeks before resolving his status. Acta's a MUCH better manager, Frank R. just deserved a better good-bye.

Now, I don't know how old you are, but Sonny J. was much, much larger a figure in D.C. than Cal. Cal is a Bawlmer guy. People in DC revered him, as did the entire nation -- and rightly so. But Sonny was much bigger. I lived in the area during both times. Football in Washington is king and will be -- until the Nationals win the World Series (hopefully). Baltimore is NOT Washington, never was, never will be. Cal was great, but not a Washingtonian.

paul said...

After all, there were never bumper stickers about Cal.

On another note, it is fun listening to Vin Scully on KABC after all these years.

Edward J. Cunningham said...

Stephen, I stand corrected about Paul, but I still maintain that Walter Johnson was more popular in his time than Sonny. I don't know how to objectively measure this though since everyone who has seen WJ play baseball is now dead. (I am not counting the famous exhibition against Babe Ruth in WWII.)

Edward J. Cunningham said...

Concerning Frank, yes I emphatically agree. If they told him months before they did about wanting a new manager, this could have been better. Also---let's be blunt---if they were willing to open up their wallets and offer Frank a fair "parting gift" in terms of money for all he did for this franchise its last few years in Montréal as well as in Washington, I don't think Frank would have exploded. In fact, I believe his number "20" may well have been retired alongside "42."

Perhaps the Nats are doing the right things in building up a long-term winner, but they are losing the public relations war and they need to get their act together.

Edward J. Cunningham said...

Did I say "Paul"? I meant "Sonny". Man, I'm going to regret not having a full night's sleep...

Anonymous said...

How can anyone say Manny is a better Manager than Frank? Please.

Frank's forgotten more about manging than Manny has learned yet. Plus, Manny isn't even able to manage like all other MLB managers. Bodes is controlling his ability to manage freely.